Why I am giving away six years work – free PDF of Energy/Resource Efficiency Book

Posted by on May 27, 2017 in Blog, My Book, News | 0 comments

I have had some kind feedback about my decision to give away a free PDF of my two-volume book on energy and resource efficiency, which sells for £59.99 (US$79.99) in print. Several people have commented on just how much work must have gone into the book and how useful it is for anyone in the energy and resource efficiency field. It is true that I have invested a lot into this book – over six years of weekends, evenings and holiday time writing the book between my “day job” as a consultant and Sustainability Director. And there are the direct costs in editing, images etc – which are not inconsiderable.

In some cases colleagues have asked me outright why on earth I am giving away such a valuable resource. There is puzzlement because folks who know me, know that I have quite a good “business head”. So I feel that I owe people an explanation.

The reason I am giving away my book is that I passionately believe that my profession – energy and resource efficiency practitioners – are central to solving one of humanity’s biggest challenges – how to do more with less. Over the years, I have observed that fellow practitioners often have great resources and knowledge about the technical or engineering aspects of their craft – but that there is virtually nothing that explains, with honesty, how to deal with the strategic, organisational, managerial, behavioral, financial and communications aspects. In fact, the plethora of self-congratulatory case studies from organisations would lead one to conclude that this efficiency stuff is easy.

I am giving away my book because I want to help my colleagues, because I am concerned about climate change and biodiversity, because the better we are at what we do, the better world we will leave for the next generation.

I don’t pretend to have all the answers in the book, but I do believe that there is much to support colleagues, and to train and enthuse the next generation of practitioners. I have been very lucky – I have worked for some outstanding clients in some remarkable programmes all over the world, alongside some truly amazing colleagues. Its time to give something back!

So how can you help? First of all please do share the PDF and the link to this blog (bit.ly/2qtzKPP) – the more folks that make use of the book the better. Second, if you have suggestions for improvements, additions or if you spot errors please do let me know – I am totally committed to getting the contents right.

Finally if you are old-fashioned, like me, and you absolutely must have a printed copy of the book, please order it through my store rather than elsewhere – I have deliberately priced the printed book at the lowest level possible, which means that when the retailer takes their minimum required 40% commission on the sale price, there is virtually nothing left. That is deliberate – this book is not a money-making project! However, by ordering the book through my store, that 40% contributes towards recovering some of the publication costs and towards future revisions and (possible) future books. There is a free shipping option to most countries and ordering through my site is the most sustainable way of shipping as each book is individually printed on demand and sent directly from the printer to you (there are no additional journeys to warehouses etc).

Above all please do use the book! You can get the free PDF here – simply select the free PDF on the left, add it to your cart, and checkout as normal.

Hopefully, there is something there to help us all do more with less.

All the best,

 

Read More

Free PDF of “Energy and Resource Efficiency without the tears”

Posted by on May 21, 2017 in Blog, My Book, News | 0 comments

I am absolutely delighted to announce that the two volumes of my book on energy and  resource efficiency have now been published as a single book.

As part of SustainSuccess’ contribution to sustainability the book, all 840 pages, is being made available FREE, in the Adobe PDF format.

I have been humbled by the outstanding reviews that leading folks in the efficiency world have give to the book:  

  • …the definitive source or making sense of energy efficiency and all of its attendant benefits.” [Christopher Russell –  Visiting Fellow, Industrial Programs,  American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy,  author of “Managing Energy from the Top Down“];
  • For anyone interested in a practical guide to improving resource and energy efficiency, this is the one and only book you need to own” [Dr Steve Fawkes – Managing Partner, EnergyPro, author of “Energy Efficiency“];
  • A very practical book which covers all the bases for practitioners and students of energy and resource efficiency alike. [Tim Sullivan – Director Energy & Property Compliance, Rolls-Royce.];
  • An authoritative and comprehensive book that will help any organisation justify and implement an effective energy and resource efficiency programme [Ray Gluckman – former President of the Institute of Refrigeration]
  • Niall Enright has produced a remarkably comprehensive manual for energy efficiency, which combines high-level insights and practical tips for developing and implementing projects and programs” [Donald Gilligan – President NAESCO]

You can get the free PDF easily. Simply go to the store, add the book to your basket and check-out. You will not be charged for the book, and on completing the check-out process, will received a download link to the PDF (17 MB).

The combined print version retails for £59.99 in paperback and £79.99 in hardback – including free postage options to most markets. The print versions also include free access to the companion files, for which there is a very modest charge for PDF version readers.

Please do feel free to:

  • Share the link to this post on your own social media pages. The shortened link is: http://bit.ly/2rqzfL7
  • Share the PDF with others (although it is better that folks download the file from the shop as they can be informed about updates to the text or additional materials)

Please don’t hesitate to give me feedback on the book. The beauty of print on demand (and PDF) is not only that this is a resource-efficient method of publication but also that the content can easily be updated regularly. You can also award the book between 1 star and 5 stars in the store, so please do come back and give it a rating!

All the best,

Niall Enright

Read More

Energy Institute

Posted by on Apr 3, 2017 in Blog, News, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Niall Enright’s contribution and achievements in energy efficiency have been recognised with his election as a Fellow of the Energy Institute and the award of Chartered Energy Manager status.

This is Niall’s reaction to the awards: “It is a real honour to receive this recognition from an organisation that is doing so much to promote the profession of energy management, and I want to thank the folks who supported my application.  For my part, I hope that I can encourage others to participate in the work of the Institute and achieve the continuous professional development that is the key to success in this rapidly moving field. I know that some people may be put off by the idea of getting membership – with the need for sponsor recommendations and evidence of competency – but I would urge them to see these as opportunities. The real reward for me is not the letters after my name, but the ability to connect with fellow professionals worldwide and the reminder that investing time and money in my own development is valuable”.

Follow this link for more information about the Energy Institute.

 

Read More

Canaries in the mine: Mega-solar plants and grid parity

Posted by on Nov 6, 2013 in Blog, News | 0 comments

megakagoshima-600x0I was thrilled to see this stunning image of Japan’s largest Solar Photovoltaic plant. This consists of 240,000 Kyocera panels providing a massive 70MWe capacity which should produce 78,800 MWh of electricity. The plant is set in 127 acres on a purpose-built island in the city of Kagoshima on the Southern Japanese island of Kyushu. If you want to see it on a map and appreciate its true scale, click here (although the satellite image is from before the completion of the plant).

Impressive thought this is, it pales by comparison with some of the mega-solar plants in the pipeline. India, for example, has just announced a 4GW scheme in Rajasthan  to be built on a 23,000-acre (9308 ha) site close to Sambhar Lake, about 75 km from Jaipur, the state capital. This will potentially triple current solar PV output for India, although it remains to be seen if the plant goes ahead as planned.  

Read More

The Sustainability Practitioner Oath

Posted by on Aug 16, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

PledgeSquareWhat gives us the right to declare ourselves “Sustainability Practitioners”? Is is our technical understanding that lifts us above narrow domain experts – e.g. climate change or energy efficiency or corporate reporting practitioners? Is it the level of people we engage with in our client organisations? Is it the multidisciplinary change management approach we employ?

The more I think about this the more I am drawn to a much more fundamental definition: a Sustainability Practitioner is someone who delivers greater sustainability.

Sad to say that much of the environmental and social consulting profession – if we are honest to ourselves – is about enabling a status quo that is unsustainable.

Read More

Do we devote enough time on energy audits?

Posted by on Aug 10, 2013 in Blog | 1 comment

You're late!In my experience many energy and resource efficiency audits are rushed. I plead guilty to multiple counts of the  the most common cause: designing the budget to meet the client’s expectations rather than the engineering or technical requirements of the job. The question is: Is this approach correct?

Read More

The curve that reveals our true performance

Posted by on May 12, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

mlo_full_recordThe only measure of our progress on climate change with any integrity is the record of atmospheric concentration of CO2. None more so than the series of readings that have been taken in the middle of the Pacific Ocean at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii which have been taken uninterrupted since 1958.  This is the Keeling Curve, named after Charles Keeling who initiated the measurements. On May the 9th these readings passed a milestone – they reached 400 parts per million for the first time.

The last time atmospheric CO2 was at this level was some 3M years ago in the Pliocene geologic era. At that time the temperatures were 2-4 degrees C higher than today and sea levels were between 5 and 40 meters higher.  The geological record gives us an insight into the long-term physical outcome of current CO2 concentrations. What is does not tell us is the impact on our biosphere, the countless living organisms on which we depend and which is facing an unprecedented rate of change in temperature.      

Read More

Free Lighting Hours tool available

Posted by on May 1, 2013 in Blog, News | 0 comments

LightingHoursThumb Just to let everyone know that I have uploaded my new Lighting Hours tool, which is free!

This was jolly fun to develop as it is a “mashup” between some code that Greg Pelletier developed which uses astronomical data to calculate sunrise and sunset at a given latitude and longitude, and some additional code from Jamie Bull which does a sexy internet lookup of a place name, postcode, landmark etc via Google Maps and returns a latitude and longitude. Add into the mix some nifty working out of TimeZones and Daylight Savings dates (e.g. First Sunday in March) for any given year and you end up with something which – IMHO – is quite neat. Hopefully useful too!

Click the link above or select Lighting Hours from the Excel Tools menu to learn more. If you want to download it you will need to give me an email address but you can opt out of marketing or future communications. Enjoy!

 

Read More

Mottainai! PWC report indicates we are too late for two degrees.

Posted by on Nov 17, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

The Japanese have a word Mottainai which “reflects a sense of regret concerning waste” which can “lead to anger or protest when the person who is observing the utter waste is incapable of holding back their emotions”. Well that sure sounds like a polite way of describing how I am feeling just now….

Why? Well I have just read a new report from PWC: Too late for two degrees? which makes very sobering reading.

We know that each year that we allow CO2 and other greenhouse gasses to accumulate in the atmosphere means that subsequent reductions need to be greater.

Back in 2000, in order to have a 50% change of global temperature rises not exceeding 2 degrees Centigrade, we needed to decarbonise our economy at the rate of 3.7% per annum to 2050. Today that target has risen to 5.1% a year because we have wasted the last decade with an average global rate of decarbonisation of just 0.8% a year.

Read More